Annotated Bibliography, English homework help – writinghub.net

Annotated Bibliography, English homework help – writinghub.net

Why should I write an annotated bibliography?

Composing an annotated bibliography is great preparation for your research paper. In doing the assignment you will:

  • Find out what has already been said about your topic, which will help you decide what argument you want to make about it.
  • Identify the most reliable and useful sources to help you make that argument.
  • Summarize, evaluate, and reflect on these sources, which will help assure that you understand them thoroughly and can use them effectively.
  • Demonstrate to your instructor and librarian that you understand the research process and get help with any aspects of it that you have questions about.
  • Library to find 4 appropriate and relevant sources that will help you write your final research paper. You must find:
    • 1 academic journal article using a Library database (your academic journal article must be at least 2 pages long and cannot be an editorial, letter to the editor, op-ed or book review).
    • 1 popular periodical (newspaper or magazine) article using a Library database.
    • 1 book using the Dominican or I-Share catalog.
    • 1 Web source using Google or other search engine of your choice.

    After you have found appropriate and relevant sources, write detailed and thorough annotations that summarize and evaluate those sources. Use the “Annotation Requirements” section on the next page to write the annotations. Each annotation should be no more than 1 page single-spaced.

  • Annotation Requirements
    For each source, write an entry, no longer than 1 page single-spaced, that contains the following:
    1. Citation in proper MLA format
      Use the “Cite” or “Cite This” feature found in databases and book catalogs to copy and paste MLA citations. Be sure to always proofread them. Web sites don’t always have a “Cite” feature, so for these or other sources without a “Cite” feature, be sure to follow the citation guidelines on your library class page.
    2. Search strategy
      State how you found the source. Include your search terms and the database, book catalog, or search engine you used.
    3. Summary
      Identify the main points (or argument or research question or hypothesis) of the source, its major methods of investigation, and its main conclusion. A summary is not just a listing of the source’s contents. Rather than simply listing contents, your summary should account for why the contents are there.
    4. Value and Usefulness
      Assess the quality of the source’s main points (or argument or research question or hypothesis) and its value to your research question. Include statements on the effectiveness of the source’s method of investigation and any of its limitations. Include specific ways the source helps answer your research question. As you read your source, ask yourself: Does it open up new ways of seeing aproblem? Does it analyze a particular body of evidence that you want to use? How do the source’s conclusions bear on your own investigation?
    5. Author
      List the credentials of the author(s), organization or sponsoring agency, including current job, area of expertise, focus of other publications, organizational mission, and/or any other information that make her/him/it qualified to write the source.
    6. Date
      Identify the publication date of the source. If the source is more than 5 years old, specify how it is still up to date for your topic.
    7. PDF of any article you requested from another library
      If you requested an article from another library, upload the PDF of the full text of the article with your bibliography.

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